Monthly Archives: August 2011

You are browsing the site archives by month.

Help Wanted: Stories of Unemployment

Stories of Unemployment

Wow. This is something I missed while on vacation. Regardless of what the content is, I just love crowdsourced stories. Unemployment is a hot topic right now as the economy continues to shake it up.

If it’s anything I love, it’s involving readers/viewers to become part of a story. When you give your audience a chance to become part of the news that is unfolding around them, the response is not only terrific, but I think you provide a greater service as a journalist.

At least, that’s my meager logic.

Source:  washingtonpostinnovations:

In an effort to highlight the people behind the numbers associated with the economic recession, The Washington Post is offering the longtime unemployed an opportunity to share their stories directly with readers.

“Help Wanted: Stories of Unemployment” is powered by six unemployment-affected families and produced by The Post’s Business section and Interactivity team. Throughout the summer of 2011, members of the families are posting their experiences as they struggle to pay the bill, preserve relationships and maintain hope for the future in Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, California, Oklahoma and Tennessee.

Read More

What stops innovation in journalism

Link: What stops innovation in journalism

Bottom line of the quick read: Quit making excuses and just get to work :)

Google and AP to fund future digital journalists

Link: Google and AP to fund future digital journalists

Google and the Associated Press have launched a national scholarship program designed to support the development of digital and new media skills in aspiring journalists.

The AP-Google Journalism and Technology Scholarship program will extend six $20,000 scholarships to undergraduate (sophomores and above) and graduate students pursuing degrees related to the intersection of journalism, computer science and new media in the 2012 to 2013 academic year.

(via Mashable)

Journalists… as told by journalists.

journalists seen by other journalists

Good grief. This is brilliant. I  know it’s (mostly) in love that we see each other this way (kind of), but it’s a love like you love your older sibling.

Would be great to see a follow-up of how the world sees each kind of journalist. That would be laughable as well.

journalists seen by other journalists

Source: futurejournalismproject

H/T Dave Cohn, founder of Spot.us

A quick glance at Adobe Muse

Adobe Muse features

The suppressed Web designer in me loves this product already. It’s like InDesign meets Dreamweaver: All you need to do is have a decent design eye and you can literally drag elements onto your page to create your site.

No code necessary.

This is great for journalists who need to get out a lot of data quickly, but have no tools or technical skills to create a page on their own. I’m sure the macho Web designers out there may scoff at this product, as it’s just for the newbie wanna-bes. And yes, there are other site-building products out there that also integrate the basics of Google and Facebook interactives – after all, it’s not rocket science.

But, we live in a world where good Web and graphic designers are pricey, and convenience tends to take over in small business and personal needs. Is there still a need for Web and graphic designers? Absolutely. Their skills are necessary for the heavy lifting side of things. I am interested to see the success of this product, and the future of product design around this concept.

Try it out: http://muse.adobe.com/index.html

QR codes give life after death

Dave Quirring scans a QR code on the grave marker of his father at Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle, Washington, on July 20, 2011. The code allows smart phones to access more information about the person such as photographs. (Greg Gilbert/Seattle Times/MCT)
Dave Quirring scans a QR code on the grave marker of his father at Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle, Washington, on July 20, 2011. The code allows smart phones to access more information about the person such as photographs. (Greg Gilbert/Seattle Times/MCT)

Dave Quirring scans a QR code on the grave marker of his father at Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle, Washington, on July 20, 2011. The code allows smart phones to access more information about the person such as photographs. (Greg Gilbert/Seattle Times/MCT)

By Susan Gilmore via The Seattle Times

Wave a smartphone over the bench-style headstone of Edouard Garneau at Holyrood Cemetery in Shoreline, Wash., and you’ll learn he was a collision-repair specialist and successful businessman who loved to barbecue, fly his airplane and travel.

You’ll see pictures of Garneau and the life he shared with his wife, Faye, and of him with his airplane and riding on an elephant.

This is all thanks to a quick-response code, or QR code, affixed to Garneau’s grave.

(read more)

(Photo credit: Greg Gilbert, The Seattle Times)

Newspaper editors and Twitter

… not a likely combination, apparently.

Jim Romenesko did his research. He identified the top ten newspapers in the country and looked up their editors on Twitter.

  • Four of the ten appear to have no Twitter account whatsoever.
  • Three others have accounts that are secret or inactive.
  • One others has not tweeted since June.
  • One (NYDN editor Kevin Convey) has an active, currently updated Twitter account.

Gawker poked fun here as well.

(source: @futurejournalismproject)